[Epub] ❤ Bark By Michael Wojtech – Marjoriejane.co.uk


Bark quotes Bark , litcharts Bark , symbolism Bark , summary shmoop Bark , Bark e657646c Many People Know How To Identify Trees By Their Leaves, But What About When Those Leaves Have Fallen Or Are Out Of Reach With Detailed Information And Illustrations Covering Each Phase Of A Tree S Lifecycle, This Indispensable Guidebook Explains How To Identify Trees By Their Bark Alone Chapters On The Structure And Ecology Of Tree Bark, Descriptions Of Bark Appearance, An Easy To Use Identification Key, And Supplemental Information On Non Bark Characteristics All Enhanced By Over 450 Photographs, Illustrations, And Maps Will Show You How To Distinguish The Textures, Shapes, And Colors Of Bark To Recognize Various Tree Species, And Also Understand Why These Traits Evolved Whether You Re A Professional Naturalist Or A Parent Leading A Family Hike, Bark A Field Guide To Trees Of The Northeast Is Your Essential Guide To The Region S 67 Native And Naturalized Tree Species.


10 thoughts on “Bark

  1. says:

    For a tree lover, just finding a book that focuses on bark earns it high marks The author developed his own key to bark characteristics for identifying trees in the northeast There were many facets of the book I loved, from the wonderful photographs to the effect of age on bark something I haven t seen addressed in other tree ID books I also really liked the section on bark ecology Know I know why some trees have shaggy bark that flakes off while others have smooth bark among other fun tidbits As the book jacket says, identification by leaf is only useful for about half the year.I do have some suggestions for improvement Since the book is touted as being most useful for winter identification, why not throw in just a bit info geared toward that end I know the book is about bark, but for example sycas and sweet gums tend to retain their fruit in winter, and most oaks hang on to their leaves It would be easy to toss in an extra picture of fruits that are retained to help with winter ID Similarly, tree or branch silhouettes could take up some of the white space...


  2. says:

    This is not only an excellent field guide, but also provides much detailed information about the structure and biology of tree bark than any of the other tree books I have read The illustrations are clear and well labeled The photos are likewise very clear and useful.If I were to have one complaint about the book, it would ...


  3. says:

    Great handbook to have in concert with one or two others for identifying trees It goes close up to the tree trunk like I like to do, but it knows what it is looking at and describes it with enough visual clues that, using the photo and the text I can feel certain when I am guessing at wha...


  4. says:

    Fun and interesting, fresh take on tree identification


  5. says:

    This is a clever and unique field guide Micahael Wojtech sets out to make a tree identification guide with bark as the main criteria It s written in an engaging and accessible manner He introduces and makes use of botanical terminology but also uses metaphors and descriptive non scientific language to help the layperson understand the concepts and terminology The chapter on bark ecology is great reading for anyone interested in trees, the injuries and illnesses they suffer, how they heal themselves, the symbiotic or parisitic relationships they have with other organisms and . My only criticism is that while I understand his project, to help people identify trees by their bark, I think the text would benefit from photographs of leaves and silhouettes of the trees This book, only has two or three pictures of the full tree and pictures of the leaf or full tree would help to confirm identification.If you are an upper midwestern reader, like...


  6. says:

    If you like trees, you ll love this little book with its myopic focus on tree bark I ll admit I skipped right past all the technical, scientific factoids straight to the up close shots of bark, accompanied by its species name, habitat, and other notes Delighted and lulled by the variant patterns and vast array of brown shades, I must say I never knew tree bark could be this good I also really like the blurbs by each photo They read like poems, Gray to brown Ridges become rough, rounded or peaked, and intersect to form long, diamond shaped furrows Color ranges from bronze to yellow to silver grey Lenticels become thicker Curls of peeling bark are abundant and may appear shredded Inner bark retains its wintergreen smell and taste Clearly there is way life going on in tree bark than I...


  7. says:

    Michael Wojtech is brilliant and I will forever be glad that he published with Tom Wessels My favorite part lately is the few pages about the spruces, because they really are difficult to distinguish I mean, we can look at soil moisture to guess if its red or black spruce, but in truth you have to look under the skinA black spruce has yellowish or olive green bark underneath the outer corky, rough, thick bark layer The others are either...


  8. says:

    This book proposes a framework for thinking about and classifying bark that transformed me from person who can t tell one tree trunk from another or even think about the differences to person identifying patterns in nature a...


  9. says:

    Bark Bark The new favorite hobby of this newbee master gardener Now I m fascinated by bark I want to be able to describe bark Bark Bark Like it sheds, or curls, or it s like vertical shingles, or horizontal shingles, or latice like How do you pronounce lenticle Anyway, even tho...


  10. says:

    Will really give you a new appreciation for the wonderful outer layer of trees You will never walk by a friendly tree again without thinking how the bark was formed, what conditions led to the tree s development, and, just possibly, identifying what tree is sharing your world space.


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